Louis Sullivan and the Carson, Pirie, Scott and Company Building Sample Essay

Art Nouveau is a really celebrated manner of art. applied art. and architecture. It is an influential design motion and an international doctrine. The name “Art Nouveau” itself means “new art” in the Gallic linguistic communication. and is besides known as “Jugendstil” in German. which shows an encapsulation of verve and young person. literally translated as “youth style” . The name “Jugendstil” derives from the Munich magazine ‘Jugend’ . foremost published in the twelvemonth 1896. which shortly became a large booster of the motion. Other states. such as Fig. 1 Russia knew the motion as “Modern” . which could good hold come from the celebrated Parisian gallery “La Maison Moderne” . nevertheless this is non to the full known. “Secession” was its name in Austria-Hungary and its province replacements. competently named after the “Viennese Secession” ; a group of Austrian creative persons. sculpturers and designers. who had broken off from the ‘Association of Austrian Artists’ . It was known in Italy as “Stile Liberty” ; the name taken from the London section shop ‘Liberty & A ; Co. ’ . in which the manner was mostly popularised. Art Nouveau is attractively inspired by construction and signifier through the natural universe ; non merely in vegetations such as workss and flowers. but besides by curvature in line work ( examples fig. 1. 2 top. left ) . Architects attempted to integrate these manners and rules into their work. seeking to harmonize with the natural environment. Art Nouveau is besides considered a doctrine in the design of furniture. which means that furniture itself. should be designed based upon the whole edifice and made portion of ordinary life – signifier and map working together in harmoniousness.

“The last 3rd of the 19 century saw the development of a basically new attack to architecture and interior design. All over Europe there was a demand for a liberating alteration of way. a desire to interrupt away from set expressions based on a medley of historical manners and a hunt for original thoughts. all of which resulted at the beginning of the 1890’s in the birth of Art Nouveau. ” The beginnings of this big and influential motion can be traced back to the 19 th century. when Czechoslovakian born pressman Alphonse Mucha ( seen in fig. 3 left ) developed lithographic postings picturing big colourful. flowered motives. that were put out on the streets of Paris in an advertisement run. turn toing the virtues and beauty of natural life. This motion rapidly spread to Glasgow via Munich and finally to Moscow. as more lithographic postings ( illustration posting fig. 4 left ) were displayed across large name high street section shops like Fortnum & A ; Masons. Fenwicks and Carneges.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

During the same epoch. America and Europe were witnessing really big and drastic alterations within society. chiefly around the dramatic spread of industrialization. This resulted in significant wealth being created and so concentrated on commercial and industrial metropoliss. Factories began to to a great extent integrate mass production methods into their industry. which created a new category of workers and made goods of huge scopes more widely available than had antecedently been seen. It was this industrial roar. and the major alterations in production and industry. that influenced and spurred Mucha to make his stylistic postings how he did. From so on. the initial purpose was to re-introduce workmanship. a assortment of originative accomplishments. and art through natural signifier back into industry. as the art of manual trade was rapidly deceasing out ;

Art Nouveau reached its zenith within the 20 century. distributing quickly through Europe into a broad scope of metropoliss. such as Paris and Nancy in France. Berlin. Munich & A ; Darmstadt in Germany. Brussels. Barcelona. Glasgow. Vienna and England ( which was in fact the state where curved signifiers foremost appeared ) .

Each metropolis had its ain reading on Art Nouveau. which led the manner to the motion itself going cosmopolitan within Europe ; nevertheless they all stayed true to the base ideals of the manner – the kernel of sinuate. drawn-out curvature through line. which was found in every design of the manner. albeit graphics. furniture or architecture. The stiff order of consecutive lines and right angles were strongly rejected in favor of natural motion. Whether it was realistic natural signifiers or abstract forms of organic verve. accent was ever on cosmetic form and level characteristics.

There was a consentaneous feeling of diverseness. and an airy elation within plants of Art Nouveau. which brought with it freedom in the manner itself. It was this freedom which the militants of the motion were endeavoring for to get down with. They wanted this artistic and natural beauty brought back into society ; and later was successful. due to its effectivity. impact upon society. and the fact that the accomplishments involved were really easy movable from maestro to pupil.

Outside of Europe. America besides embraced the of all time turning Art Nouveau manner. chiefly in its larger metropoliss like New York. and more significantly. Chicago. Chicago took a immense liking to Art Nouveau within the 20 century. being a metropolis which had seen extended fiscal. commercial and industrial growing at the bend of the century. This was down to a figure of cardinal Fig. 5 figurehead designers and interior decorators. This explosion of prosperity had surprisingly emerged from a annihilating fire. subsequently known as “The Great Chicago Fire” ( depicted in fig. 5. 6 top. left ) . The catastrophe was a inferno. which burned from the 8 Thursday th largest U. S. catastrophes of the nineteenth century. with the 2nd star upon the Municipal flag of Chicago. marking the calamity.

Much like a sapling germination from the burnt ashes of a wood fire. the metropolis of Chicago began to reconstruct ; making a bigger and better metropolis than earlier. A adult male called Joseph Medill. genuinely captured the sense of the metropolis in a ‘Tribune’ column he wrote on the 11 October ( fig. 7 left ) : “In the thick of a catastrophe without analogue in the world’s history. looking upon the ashes of 30 years’ accretions. the people of this one time beautiful metropolis have resolved that Chicago Shall Rise Again” . A message such as that is what the public needed to hike their liquors ; to drive them on to construct a Fig. 7 more comfortable hereafter for Chicago. Alot of the metropolis. including stockyards and railwaies. fortunately survived the fire integral. so from the charred remains of the old lumber constructions. buildings of more modern beginnings arose ; comprised of rock and steel. These modern methods of building proved to be so successful that they went on to put the case in point for future world-wide building. Improvements to the current mass theodolite systems ( such as ropewaies – fig. 8 left ) were being created throughout the metropolis and extremist new inventions were being implemented ; alongside a aggregation of new railroad Stationss being built. later doing the railwaies cardinal to the life of the metropolis. From this. horizontal metropolis enlargement began to greatly Fig. 8 accelerate. hiking people’s religion in the resurgence. The metropolis besides began to turn upwards. with the rise of new edifices. such as skyscrapers. which promoted the perpendicular growing of Chicago.

Architects and structural applied scientists flocked to the metropolis around this clip ; taking full advantage of the of all time turning prosperity. It was these people. along with occupant Chicagoan designers and applied scientists. which developed the new signifiers of design and building as they rebuilt. As mentioned earlier. there were a figure of front mans who introduced Chicago to Art Nouveau on a big graduated table. One of these chief front mans ( arguably the most influential ) was the late. great architect Louis Sullivan ( fig. 9 left ) ; one of the few American designers to happen a topographic point in the international Art Nouveau motion. He was nil less than an astonishing adult male and a superb designer. Sullivan perceived design and architecture from a different angle than most ; standing strongly by his most celebrated stating “life is recognizable in its look. that signifier of all time follows map.

This is the law” ( finally shortened to “form follows function” ) . which non surprisingly. became the ‘battle-cry’ of 1000s of designers Fig. 9 within the modernist motion ; still widely being used today. The phrase is basically a belief. puting the demands of aesthetics below practicality. Influential designers and interior decorators literally took the phrase to connote that ornamentation upon the more modern edifices was finally considered inordinate and deemed unneeded. Contrary to this belief. Sullivan himself ne’er designed. allow entirely thought along those sorts of dogmatic avenues during the more successful old ages of his calling. His edifices had every possibility. in their rule multitudes. to be simple and minimalistic. nevertheless he frequently chose to mark their bare surfaces with eruptions of elegant Art Nouveau Fig. 10 decorations and ornaments extracted from the Celtic Revival ( illustration left ) . The designs ranged from natural organic signifiers such as Hedera helix and vines. to more geometric. fretted designs. inspired by his heritage of Irish design. He had them dramatis personae in terra cotta ( and in some instances iron ) . due to Terra cotta being easier to work with than rock masonry ; non to advert that is well lighter.

Aside from his phrases. beliefs and design methodological analysis. he is more normally known as the “father of skyscrapers” . due to the bulk of the architectural universe sing him as the Godhead of the modern skyscraper. They consider him the Godhead because he was on the ‘modern construction’ bandwagon brushing Chicago ; being practically the first designer to build his skyscrapers utilizing steel frames. In times old. the strength of skyscrapers and high rises came from the strength of the supporting walls.

Obviously. the taller the edifice. the more strain at that place would be upon the lower subdivisions of the edifice. This restricted how high they could construct before it became unstable and unsafe. The lone manner around this was to do the lower burden bearing walls laughably thick. which was a waste of stuffs and infinite ; nevertheless. the steel building methods Sullivan used. changed those regulations wholly ( fig. 11 left ) . The steel frame lattice designs supported the tonss as opposed to the walls. and distributed the weight throughout the edifices more equally. It really proved to be so effectual that it was used in a premium of other tall edifices which were rapidly being erected at the clip. Their outsides were besides capable to his Art Nouveau/Celtic decorated decorations.

With these designs. Sullivan successfully brought elements of nature into the urban landscape. much like Alphonse Mucha in Paris. and accomplishing what the Art Nouveau motion set out to accomplish in the first topographic point. Fig. 11 His great influence within architecture allowed him to place as a critic of the Chicago School. and go an inspiration of the Prairie School ( a group of Chicagoan designers ) . More interesting is the fact that he happened to be a wise man to none other than Frank Lloyd Wright ; sharing many of his abilities. act uponing Wright to besides inform his designs around the natural universe. despite him developing a really different aesthetic. Along with Frank Lloyd Wright and another designer by the name of Henry Hobson Richardson. Sullivan is one of the ‘recognised trinity’ of American architecture.

Louis Sullivan designed a menagerie of edifices in his calling. most of which were constructed in Chicago – Selz. Schwab and Company Factory. Standard Club of Chicago. Hebrew Manual Training School and James H. Walker Warehouse and Company Store. to call merely a few. However. there is one edifice which Sullivan designed and constructed towards the terminal of his calling. which is arguably the most influential edifice he had of all time created and so the most influential edifice Chicago had of all time seen to Fig. 12 day of the month ( in footings of building and Art Nouveau ornamentation ) .

In 1872. two work forces called Leopold Schlesinger and David Mayer formed a concern partnership. which began after they immigrated to Chicago from the province of Bavaria. get downing on the long route to the development and production of the Carson. Pirie. Scott and Company Building ( fig. 12 left ) – Sullivan’s influential edifice and part to Chicago. The edifice was to be commercial. built on the corner of East Madison Street ; with the reference – 1

South State Street. and was foremost called the ‘Schlesinger and Mayer Department Store’ . which saw completion in 1899. nevertheless it was expanded and sold to Carson Pirie Scott and Company in 1904. Chicago besides happened to hold merely emerged from a depression in the 1870’s and with it came the revival of State Street. It made perfect sense to do this the cardinal location for the edifice. as it had become a desirable country of the metropolis.

Staying true to his building methodological analysis. Sullivan designed the edifice around a singular steel-framed construction ( fig. 13 left ) . which allowed for a dramatically increased window country. This country was shown physically by the usage of by bay-wide Windowss ( fig. 14 bottom left ) . which in bend. allowed for the highest per centum of daytime come ining into the big insides of the edifice. This so allowed for the creative activity and presentation of larger retail shows. seeable to outside prosaic traffic walking by. This design characteristic created the thought of the ‘sidewalk showcase’ . with the purpose of pulling Fig. 13 more possible clients – an effectual move to do. in order to equal the other section shops in the metropolis. In between the big Windowss were excessive sets of munificent terra cotta. to farther pull the oculus towards the edifice and the Windowss. The initial program was for Sullivan to utilize white Georgia preies ; but he reverted to utilizing terra cotta ( as he did many times on his old edifices ) Another ground for the Fig. 14 material alteration. was that stonecutters in 1898 were striking through the continuance of building ; so material pick was limited.

To congratulate the terra-cotta ornament. extremely elaborate. cast-iron. Bronze-plated. cosmetic work was added above the rounded tower at the top of the edifice. Both the usage of terra cotta and bronze was of import to guaranting the edifice was alone. due to the fact that non merely was it beautiful ornamentation. but it basically made the exterior fire resistant ; the bronze was every bit immune as Cu sheets and the terra cotta was a clay-based ceramic. It later created a strong sense of monumentality.

Sullivan genuinely thought that the edifice would be a great plus to Chicago for a long clip. and so took excess safeguard against the dangers of fire. by put ining a 40 pes H2O tower upon the roof. so the sprinkler system would be supplied with adequate H2O ( despite the exterior already being well fire resistant ) . The celebrated corner entry of the section shop ( north-east entryway. fig. 15 left ) is what made the edifice so celebrated and influential. and is why it is still to this twenty-four hours. It was meant to be seen both from State Street and Madison Street. hence the curvature. as opposed to a typical angled corner.

The astonishing green ironwork ornamentation ( fig. 16 bottom left ) that covers the entryway writhes around its canopies. giving the full shop an elegant Fig. 14 alone character. which was of paramount importance to the fight of the neighbouring retail shops. It proved to be an effectual and successful Fig. 15 representation of Art Nouveau and Celtic art. In the first few old ages of development there was a little add-on added to the edifice that shortly grew to be extremely valuable in descrying the edifice from a distance. The prosaic span was this add-on. and connected the train station ( located behind the section shop on Wabash Avenue ) . to the edifices 2nd floor. This characteristic was besides covered in luxuriant metalwork. much like the remainder of the outside. supplying a particular Fig. 16 sense of entry into the edifice.

The edifice is portion of the Chicago school. being one of its authoritative constructions. The flowery cosmetic panels on the lower narratives of the edifice were finally accredited to being a design creative activity of George Grant Elmslie. who was the main draughtsman of Sullivan’s after Frank Lloyd Wright ended up go forthing the house. Elmslie besides left the house himself after a piece. taking with him the same distinguishable scrollwork panel designs. which were subsequently seen crawling back into the public oculus in his ain designs ; with Sullivan’s manner proceeding elsewhere. Despite their differences in design. both Sullivan and Elmslie extracted their designs and techniques from really similar beginnings. that being the influence of Celtic art and Celtic metalwork. The manner Elmslie used this peculiar technique on the lower floors of the edifice was so intricate and luxuriant that it utilised shadows and natural visible radiation. to make an semblance where the lower floors appeared to be drifting above the land.

On the opposite terminal of the edifice. the top floors of the 1899 and 1904 subdivisions of the edifice had been recessed in order to do manner for the creative activity of a narrow loggia ( gallery or corridor which is unfastened to the exterior ) . finalised by an elaborately elaborate valance. which projected outwards and beyond the edifice facade. This characteristic ended up being wholly removed towards the twelvemonth of 1948 ( about ) . with the 12th floor so being redesigned. so the designs so matched that of the lower floors. As the old ages passed. the edifice became more popular and successful. with subsequent enlargements being added and completed by Daniel Burnham in 1906 and Holabird and Root in 1961. In 2007. the section shop eventually closed its doors one time and for all. discontinuing to be the Carson. Pirie. Scott and Company edifice. Today. the 56. 000 m edifice is now known as edifice grow and germinate into what it is today. Both the inside and exterior saw many design alterations. nevertheless the one characteristic which ever stayed the same was of class. the building’s brilliant Art Nouveau entryway.

There were few topographic points in the universe between the 19 and 20 centuries which presented so much of an repetitive statement of modern design and building than that of State Street. Chicago. Louis Sullivan gave architecture a graphic definition. most conspicuously in the Carson. Pirie. Scott and Company edifice. It is nil less than a work of art. I candidly think that the modernness of the edifice is profoundly rooted into the historical procedure of industrial transmutation in society.

This clip had revealed the section shop paradigm as a characteristic establishment. Sullivan at this clip observed and studied society really closely. frequently giving his ain sentiments. until he finally contributed himself ; taking into consideration everything he’d studied to make architecture that that showed utmost advancement and near flawlessness for the epoch. Sullivan’s architectural methodological analysis was based around comprehending a edifice as an organic signifier. holding a seeable outward signifier as the word picture of its internal life. It seems that he wanted to gain the construct of continuity and integrity of signifier ; demoing a edifice as an look of a living thing. The Carson. Pirie. Scott and Company edifice is an ideal illustration of this thought. as the artistic Art Nouveau exterior plants with the map of the edifice i. e. the cosmetic enrichment was closely linked to the techniques used in the building’s window shows.

The ornamentation deliberately attracted the outside universe by underscoring the big Windowss and their shows. Here we have form working together with map in a perfect understanding. You can non deny that at the bend of the century. his work was seen as definite cogent evidence of the verve of a regional school of architecture and could besides be compared to European Art Nouveau. as an attempt to free architecture from the dependance it had on historical manners. He created architecture that was of his ain design and his ain thoughts. This is decidedly apparent with the Carson. Pirie. Scott and Company edifice. It was the apogee of Sullivan’s work ; his testimonial to the Art Nouveau motion. and one of his concluding parts to the rapid development of Chicago. In many senses. I’d say the edifice is besides the apogee of Art Nouveau ( due to Art Nouveau largely vanishing throughout the First World War ) and the pinnacle of the growing in the metropolis. He gave the universe modern building techniques and opened us up to whole new side of architecture of which the universe had ne’er seen before.

Bibliography

1. Wikimedia Foundation Inc. ( Last Modified: 21 July 2012 ) Art Nouveau [ Online ] Available at: nd hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Art_nouveau [ Accessed 22 July 2012 ] 2. Quoted ( by Keiichi Tahara ) from: Tahara. K. 2000. Art Nouveau Architecture. London: Thames & A ; Hudson. pg. 10 ISBN: 0-50028-259-5 3. JVJ Publishing – Illustrators ( Last Modified: 2011 ) Mucha. by Jim Vadeboncoeur. Jr. [ Online ] rd Available at: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. bpib. com/illustrat/mucha. htm [ Accessed 23 July 2012 ] 4. Kingsley. R. 1998. Art Nouveau Architecture and Furniture. London: Grange Books. pg. 7 ISBN: 1-84013-123-3 5. Tahara. K. 2000. Art Nouveau Architecture London: Thames & A ; Hudson. pg. 11 ISBN: 0-50028-259-5 6. Kingsley. R. 1998. Art Nouveau Architecture and Furniture. London: Grange Books. pg. 7 ISBN: 1-84013-123-3 7. Wikimedia Foundation Inc. ( Last Modified: 1 August 2012 ) The Great Chicago Fire [ Online ] Thursday Available at: hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Great_Chicago_Fire [ Accessed 4 August 2012 ] 8. Quoted ( by Joseph Medill ) from: Harold. M. 1969. Chicago: Growth of a Metropolis. Chicago: London: University of Chicago. pg. 117 ISBN: 0-22651-273-8 9. Harold. M. 1969. Chicago: Growth of a Metropolis. Chicago: London: University of Chicago Press. pg. 124 – 128 ISBN: 0-22651-273-8 10. Quoted ( by Louis Sullivan ) from: Siry. J. 1988. Carson. Pirie. Scott: Louis Sullivan and the Chicago Department Store. Chicago: London: University of Chicago Press. pg. 235 ISBN: 0-22676-136-3 11. Wikimedia Foundation Inc. ( Last Modified: 24 July 2012 ) Louis Sullivan [ Online ] Available at: Thursday hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Louis_Sullivan [ Accessed 24 July 2012 ] 12. Wikimedia Foundation Inc. ( Last Modified: 24 July 2012 ) Louis Sullivan [ Online ] Available at: Thursday hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Louis_Sullivan
[ Accessed 24 July 2012 ] 13. Wikimedia Foundation Inc. ( Last Modified: 24 July 2012 ) Louis Sullivan [ Online ] Available at: Thursday hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Louis_Sullivan [ Accessed 24 July 2012 ] 14. O’Gorman. James F. 1991. Three American Architects: Richardson. Sullivan and Wright. Chicago: London: University of Chicago Press ISBN: 0-22662-071-9 15. Wikimedia Foundation Inc. ( Last Modified: 24 July 2012 ) Louis Sullivan [ Online ] Available at: Thursday hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Louis_Sullivan [ Accessed 25 July 2012 ] 16. Siry. J. 1988. Carson. Pirie. Scott: Louis Sullivan and the Chicago Department Store. Chicago: London: University of Chicago Press. pg. 65. 66 ISBN: 0-22676-136-3 17. Siry. J. 1988. Carson. Pirie. Scott: Louis Sullivan and the Chicago Department Store. Chicago: London: University of Chicago Press. pg. 225 – 226 ISBN: 0-22676-136-3 18. Wikimedia Foundation Inc. ( Last Modified: 22 June 2012 ) Carson. Pirie. Scott and Company Building [ Online ] Available at: Thursday hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Carson. _Pirie. _Scott_and_Company_Building [ Accessed 26 July 2012 ] 19. Siry. J. 1988. Carson. Pirie. Scott: Louis Sullivan and the Chicago Department Store. Chicago: London: University of Chicago Press. pg. 93 – 158 ISBN: 0-22676-136-3 neodymium Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday st

Located on the TITLE PAGE and PAGE 4 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/File: LouisSullivan. jpg Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/ Located on the TITLE PAGE Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. american-architecture. info/USA/CHICAGO/CHIC-LS/CHIC-LS-020. htm Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/ Located on the TITLE PAGE and PAGE 3 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //jmarke. wordpress. com/2011/03/03/unsustainable-chicago-1900-on-thebrink-of-ecological-disaster/ Website was found through utilizing:
hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/ Located on PAGE 1 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. prices4antiques. com/sculpture/bronze/Bronze-Sculpture-Carlier-EmileJoseph-Nestor-signed-Art-Nouveau-Figure-of-Woman-9-inch-D9808997. htm Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/ Located on PAGE 1 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //mybestongoogleplus. blogspot. co. uk/2012/03/art-nouveau-by-alfons-mucha. hypertext markup language Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/ Located on PAGE 1 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Alphonse_Mucha Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/

Located on PAGE 2 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/File: Mucha-Maud_Adams_as_Joan_of_Arc-1909. jpg Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/ Located on PAGE 3 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/File: Chicago-fire2. jpeg Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/ Located on PAGE 3 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/File: Chicago-fire1. jpg Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/

Located on PAGE 3 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/File: ChicagoTribuneFire. jpg Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/ Located on PAGE 4 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. flickr. com/photos/nationalregister/galleries/72157630782042058/ Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/

Located on PAGE 5 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //andrewraimist. com/2009/02/louis-sullivan-wainwright-building. hypertext markup language Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/

Located on PAGE 6 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/File: Carson_Pirie_Scott_building. _Chicago. _Illinois__Louis_Sullivan. jpg Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/

Located on PAGE 6 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //calumet412. tumblr. com/post/18212887827/the-schlesinger-meyer-departmentstore-under Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/ Located on PAGE 6 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. flickriver. com/photos/wallyg/170659365/ Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/ Located on PAGE 7 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. flickr. com/photos/tanjatiziana/5204354757/ Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/

Located on PAGE 7 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: [ electronic mail protected ]/7547538876/lightbox/ Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/ Located on PAGE 8 Found at: hypertext transfer protocol: //blog. archpaper. com/wordpress/archives/tag/carson -pirie-scott-building Website was found through utilizing: hypertext transfer protocol: //www. Google. co. uk/